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A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

National curriculum in England - Science KS1, KS2

Science is taught each term as part of topic work following the National Curriculum. Children are encouraged to think about their own understanding of the world around them, to ask questions and to explore finding the answers to these questions through investigations. Investigative science is the core element of the science curriculum and at least fifty percent of science taught is practical investigation. Children are taught how to ask questions and then decide the best way to find the answer to the question. They may be through a planned investigation which involves making a prediction, keeping it fair by changing the one variable they are testing for, using a range of equipment safely, to measure and record their results, draw conclusions from these and then presenting their results. Or it may be through observation, research, pattern finding and field work.

Science is taught each term as part of topic work following the National Curriculum. Children are encouraged to think about their own understanding of the world around them, to ask questions and to explore finding the answers to these questions through investigations. Investigative science is the core element of the science curriculum and at least fifty percent of science taught is practical investigation. Children are taught how to ask questions and then decide the best way to find the answer to the question. They may be through a planned investigation which involves making a prediction, keeping it fair by changing the one variable they are testing for, using a range of equipment safely, to measure and record their results, draw conclusions from these and then presenting their results. Or it may be through observation, research, pattern finding and field work.